What's In a Name for Myspace?

Looks like MySpace is back at it. This week, the former social media hot spot put into motion an attempt to become relevant once again. On Wednesday it officially launched a new ad campaign worth $20 million in hopes of making a comeback. The campaign will include broadcast, cable, radio, and digital — which will run through the end of the summer.

I have to admit that I just clicked on the new website and it actually looks pretty cool. That is until my eye wandered to the footer noting the logo. It’s been updated, of course, but I just can’t get over that it’s, well, MySpace.

I want to like it, I really do, but it’s MySpace. Now, if you’re in the music industry, MySpace continues to be a pretty solid site for publishing music and attracting fans. According to Specific Media CEO Tim Vanderhook and COO Chris Vanderhook, the focus of Myspace will remain on music and creative individuals — especially those involved in the process such as songwriters, video directors, and photographers.

Unfortunately, while MySpace was busy falling under the radar, other sites like WordPress, Tumblr, Spotify, and Vimeo have become new go-to outlets for musicians to set up shop.

Maybe if MySpace goes after a younger audience — meaning the audience I once was when MySpace first launched — it could have a fighting chance. I’m pretty sure I’ve outgrown MySpace and over the years have become a dedicated fan of other social media sites. It’s likely that the newest round of 21-year-olds might venture to the site, but there are a lot of other options out there — options that I didn’t have at 21.

Back in “the day” it was just MySpace, YouTube, and Facebook. Now there’s far more than just those three. No offense to MySpace, but I’m skeptical. I should feel nostalgic, but I can’t get over the old image of MySpace. And I’m not talking about user interface — I’m talking about the users. The poorly designed personal profiles, coupled with the average user’s inability to use grammar correctly, reminds me a lot of present-day Match.com.

How does a company like MySpace reenter the marketplace? Well, it’s taken a few positive steps — new website, new look, new interface, new scrolling direction, new layout, and more importantly, it offers a new incentive — connect with musicians and discover new music. Negative step — same name. I’m tempted to set up a profile on MySpace, but I just can’t forget what MySpace once was — and that’s not a good thing. Perhaps in its relaunch and rebranding MySpace should’ve taken its $20 million and rebranded as something not called MySpace.

This post was written by me and was originally published on Beneath the Brand on June 14, 2013.